Lightweight Portable Oxygen Concentrator

Lightweight portable oxygen concentrators are easily moved around the house or are lightweight, portable devices that you can take with you while you walk, shop, travel, or go to appointments.

A lightweight portable air concentrator designed for home use is a unit on wheels or a cart that weighs less than 20 pounds.

Lightweight Portable concentrators can weigh less than five pounds and can be carried in a small bag or backpack.

Most portable oxygen concentrators are AC or DC powered and rechargeable, so they can be used at home or on the go.

The downside is that portable devices are considerably more expensive than their larger and heavier counterparts.

Lightweight Portable Oxygen Concentrator
Lightweight Portable Oxygen Concentrator

Traveling with oxygen concentrator

The only oxygen equipment allowed on an airplane is the portable oxygen concentrator. If you need oxygen in flight, you must carry a portable oxygen concentrator and you must inform your airline in advance. They may require a letter from the doctor to verify the need for the POC on the plane.

Traveling with oxygen has become much easier with the development of lightweight portable oxygen concentrators. These devices run on a battery pack, can be recharged, plugged into the wall or a cigarette lighter in a car, and can be taken on airplanes.

There are several makes and models, with widely differing features, so it is important to choose the one that is best for you, that delivers enough oxygen to keep your saturation 90 percent or greater at rest and with activity. Lightweight portable oxygen can be rented or purchased from various oxygen suppliers.

Travel o2

Oxygen use has extended from inpatient to outpatient settings for patients with chronic pulmonary diseases and complications of the respiratory system.

The indications, advantages, and disadvantages of each device and delivery system are presented, aiming to offer updated knowledge to the multidisciplinary team members managing patients with respiratory failure, and therefore allowing appropriate selection of devices and delivery systems that are tailored to the needs of each patient.

The Federal Aviation Administration doesn’t allow passengers to bring portable oxygen tanks or liquid oxygen on flights.

This leaves a portable oxygen concentrator as your only option when it comes to traveling by air.

This law applies to all United States aircraft with more than 19 seats. All flights traveling to and from the United States must allow portable oxygen concentrators as well.

This rule eliminates operational requirements and allows passengers to use a portable oxygen concentrator that works for their needs.

What is the lightest weight oxygen concentrator?

The AirSep Focus is a major breakthrough in portable oxygen technology, being the world’s smallest and lightest portable oxygen concentrator. This breakthrough in portable oxygen technology weighs in at only 0.8kg/1.75lbs standing at just 6.2inc/15.7cm high.

How much does a portable oxygen concentrator weigh?

Medium portable oxygen concentrators are between 6 and 10 lbs by themselves, or with the external battery installed.

Is it worth buying an oxygen concentrator?

Each one of us will love to have disease-free life so that we can make out the most from it. So buying an oxygen concentrator is a wise decision and you should not give it a second thought. You will remain healthy and that will affect your mood, you will feel full of energy and can work efficiently too.

Lightweight Portable Oxygen Concentrator
Lightweight Portable Oxygen Concentrator

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portable oxygen concentrator

Smallest portable oxygen concentrator

Life changes when you need supplemental oxygen on a regular basis. Portable oxygen concentrators are little machines that change lives.

Portable Oxygen Concentrator FAA Approved

Portable Oxygen Concentrator FAA Approved

The Federal Aviation Administration generally prohibits the use of personal oxygen units during flights because they contain compressed gas or liquid oxygen, which are defined as hazardous materials. However, the FAA does allow the onboard use of certain portable oxygen concentrators.

What portable oxygen concentrators are approved by the FAA

What portable oxygen concentrators are approved by the FAA?

The Federal Aviation Administration, or FAA, has ruled that all passengers who require oxygen must be allowed to bring FAA-approved portable oxygen concentrators on all U.S. aircraft with more than 19 seats.

Portable oxygen concentrator for travel

Traveling with oxygen has become much easier with the development of portable oxygen concentrator for travel (POCs).

These devices are battery-powered, can be recharged, plugged into a wall or car cigarette lighter, and can be carried on airplanes.

There are several makes and models, with different characteristics, so it is important to choose the one that is best for you, which provides enough oxygen to maintain your saturation at 90 percent or more at rest and with activity.

POCs can be rented or purchased from various oxygen providers.

Portable oxygen concentrator for travel
Portable oxygen concentrator for travel

Oxygen for travel

Some people can become hypoxemic while traveling or living at high altitudes, hypoxia is a term to describe a lack of oxygen in the blood.

A simple pulse oximeter reading while at high altitude, at rest, and during activity, can determine if oxygen is needed at altitude.

Some labs may perform an altitude simulation test to determine your oxygen saturation at altitude.

This test involves breathing in a mixture of 16 percent oxygen, which is equivalent to the amount of oxygen in the air at 8,000 feet, and then taking a pulse oximeter reading.

Portable oxygen for travel

Traveling with portable oxygen in a car or other mode of transportation can seem difficult.

Before you start planning any type of oxygen trip, you will first need to get permission from your doctor to travel.

You may also need to sign a letter for the airline, train, bus, or cruise line you are traveling with.

Once you have obtained a doctor’s clearance to travel, you will need to be aware of the regulations and restrictions for traveling with oxygen.

Whether you’re traveling by car, bus, or plane, there will be some rules to follow and practical things you can do to make traveling on oxygen as easy as possible.

Oxygen for travelling by air

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requires that anyone traveling on oxygen present a letter from their physician stating their need. The FAA has approved two types of portable medical oxygen devices and allows airline passengers to carry them on the plane.

The two oxygen devices work by filtering nitrogen from the air and supplying concentrated oxygen to the user. Because the devices do not carry compressed oxygen, they are not considered dangerous to flight safety.

If you are traveling by plane, check with your oxygen supply company to see if they carry one of the two portable oxygen devices. You will need a physician’s order for portable oxygen.

Some airlines may not allow passengers to carry FAA-approved devices and instead require passengers to use oxygen on board the airline.

Others may allow passengers to use their own oxygen on the runway, but switch to the plane’s oxygen once on board. Be sure to check with your airline before your flight to find out what their rules and restrictions are.

Traveling with oxygen by car

If you are traveling by car and your vehicle is large enough to carry your oxygen concentrator, you can take it with you and use it whenever and wherever it has electrical outlets.

Talk to your oxygen provider about how much backup oxygen you will need. They can also help you arrange oxygen pickup from another source at your destination if you are unable to bring your concentrator.

You’ll also want the number of an oxygen provider at your destination anyway in case you have a malfunction or other oxygen emergency.

It is important to store your oxygen out of direct sunlight and away from any heat source.

Traveling with oxygen by cruise ship

If you are dependent on oxygen or require oxygen therapy, you must supply your own oxygen, and meet certain requirements prior to boarding the ship.

Guests taking an oxygen cylinder or concentrator while on tour should provide in advance the dimensions of the device to accessible shore excursions.

Traveling with oxygen on airlines

Air travel exposes people to lower air pressure and lower than normal oxygen levels.

For most people, these changes are not noticeable. However, for patients with certain underlying lung conditions, small atmospheric changes can have significant and potentially serious effects.

Commercial airlines must provide a cabin pressure altitude of no more than 8,000 feet altitude.

Your pulmonologist can determine if air travel is safe for you. Your pulmonologist may request an altitude simulation test to help determine your ability to fly safely at this cabin pressure.

The only oxygen equipment allowed on an airplane is the portable oxygen concentrator (POC).

If you need oxygen in flight, you must carry a portable oxygen concentrator and inform your airline in advance.

They may require a letter from the doctor to verify the need for the POC on the plane. If you don’t have a POC, you can rent one for travel, either through your oxygen supplier or through websites.

Airplane cabin pressure effects on body

Exposure to low air pressure in flights.

The effects of increased altitude and associated reductions in air pressure can result in an expansion of air or gas trapped within the body. Trapped air or gas can be located in places that include:

  • Nasal sinuses
  • Tubes inside the ear
  • Abnormal pockets within the lung
  • Internal organs in the abdominal cavity

As atmospheric pressure drops, the trapped air expands. This explains the “ear noise” that most travelers are familiar with. When air is trapped in the chest, the expansion of the gas can be life-threatening.

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What portable oxygen concentrators are approved by the FAA

What portable oxygen concentrators are approved by the FAA?

The Federal Aviation Administration, or FAA, has ruled that all passengers who require oxygen must be allowed to bring FAA-approved portable oxygen concentrators on all U.S. aircraft with more than 19 seats.

Portable Oxygen Concentrator FAA Approved

Portable Oxygen Concentrator FAA Approved

The FAA generally prohibits the use of personal oxygen units during flights because they contain compressed gas or liquid oxygen, which are defined as hazardous materials.

portable oxygen concentrator

Smallest portable oxygen concentrator

Life changes when you need supplemental oxygen on a regular basis. Portable oxygen concentrators are little machines that change lives.

How to Set oxygen level on concentrator?

Oxygen concentrators work in the same way as an oxygen cylinder or tank. An oxygen concentrator is a medical device that concentrates oxygen from ambient air.

Atmospheric air is about 79 percent nitrogen and 20 percent oxygen, and other gases make up the remaining 1 percent. They suck in air from the environment, remove unwanted gases, concentrate oxygen, and then blow it through a tubing so patients can breathe pure oxygen.

How to Set oxygen level on concentrator?

How to set the oxygen level on a concentrator?

  • Position the machine 1 to 2 feet (0.30 to 0.60 m) from the wall and furniture. The machine needs to extract oxygen and release exhaust gases, so it needs a lot of space.
  • Attach your humidification bottle if one is prescribed.
  • Connect your oxygen tubing to the humidification bottle or adapter.
  • Make sure your air filter is in place. Your oxygen concentrator has an air intake filter that removes particles and allergens from the air.

How to use oxygen concentrator?

How to turn on your oxygen concentrator?

  • Turn on your oxygen concentrator at least 15 minutes before using it.
  • Plug into a grounded outlet that is not in use.
  • Your oxygen concentrator should be the only item plugged into that outlet, as it will consume a lot of power.
  • Switch the start button to the “on” position.
  • Hear the alarm.
  • Your oxygen concentrator should sound an alarm when it is turned on.
  • This is to make sure it doesn’t accidentally turn on when it shouldn’t.

How to adjust the oxygen flow in the oxygen concentrator?

  • Locate the control knob or turn on your oxygen concentrator.
  • Turn the knob or switch until it points to your prescribed number.
  • Your doctor will prescribe the proper amount of oxygen for you.
  • If you are not sure which setting to use, call your doctor for clarification.

How to put on the mask or nasal cannula?

  • Check your tubing to see if it is kinked or bent.
  • These can interrupt the flow of oxygen, so they need to be stretched.
  • Place your mask on your face for low oxygen levels.
  • Make sure there are no gaps around the edges of the mask.
  • Place your nasal cannula up into your nostrils for high oxygen levels.
  • Breathe through your mask or nasal cannula.
  • Breathe as you normally would, allowing the machine to supplement its oxygenation.
  • Use the machine for as long as your doctor recommends.

Oxygen concentrator flow rate

With many of the home and portable concentrators on the market, the oxygen flowing through the device is typically measured in liters per minute, although there are some that provide milliliters per minute.

Normally, continuous flow oxygen concentrators provide liters per minute, while pulse concentrators use milliliters per minute of oxygen in pulsed doses.

Those requiring oxygen therapy will receive a prescription from their physician informing them of their oxygen flow needs, such as 2.0 liters per minute, which is a common prescription.

However, the exact amount you need can vary. Recipes can vary between 1 liter and 10 liters per minute in most cases.

What type of oxygen concentrator do you need?

Just because you need to have a flow rate of 2.0 liters per minute does not mean that you necessarily have to have a continuous flow concentrator.

There are also pulse flow options that may work for you. You just need to make sure to talk to your doctor about your specific needs to make sure you’re getting just what you need.

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What is Oxygen Concentrator?

What is Oxygen Concentrator?

An oxygen concentrator is a medical device used to supply oxygen to people who are short of breath.

Portable Oxygen Concentrator continuous Flow

Portable Oxygen Concentrator continuous Flow

Instead of scheduling regular refills or replacements for tanks, a portable oxygen concentrator takes in ambient air and sends it through a filtration process to produce medical-grade quality oxygen.

What is Oxygen Concentrator?

An oxygen concentrator is a medical device used to supply oxygen to people who are short of breath.

An oxygen concentrator uses nearby air to filter oxygen and is the best solution for supplying oxygen in the home.

People whose blood oxygen concentration is lower than normal often require an oxygen concentrator to replace that oxygen.

What is oxygen concentrator machine?

It is a way to obtain additional oxygen in the body, it is through the use of an oxygen concentrator at home that we can move freely.

Oxygen concentrators are medical devices that must be sold and used only with a prescription.

Why do we need an oxygen concentrator machine?

To survive, we need oxygen to go from our lungs to the cells of our body. Sometimes the amount of oxygen in our blood can drop below normal levels.

Asthma, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the flu are some of the health problems that can cause oxygen levels to drop.

When levels are too low, we may need to take in extra oxygen, known as oxygen therapy.

What is the use of oxygen concentrator?

There are many reasons to use an oxygen concentrator, and doctors may recommend oxygen therapy to their patients for various medical conditions. Generally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air and transfer it into the bloodstream.

If you recently had blood tests or pulse oximetry to assess your oxygen saturation levels and were found to have low oxygen levels in your blood, your doctor may recommend short-term or long-term oxygen therapy.

You should not use an oxygen concentrator at home unless it has been prescribed by a healthcare provider.

Giving yourself oxygen without first consulting a doctor can do more harm than good. You may end up taking in too much or too little oxygen. Deciding to use an oxygen concentrator without a prescription can lead to serious health problems, such as oxygen toxicity caused by getting too much oxygen.

Oxygen therapy at home

Find out if you really need oxygen therapy by consulting with your healthcare provider. If you do, your healthcare provider can determine how much oxygen to take and for how long.

You are probably wondering what an oxygen concentrator is used for.

Acute conditions often require short-term oxygen therapy. These conditions usually occur for a short period of time.

They can have a sudden onset of symptoms compared to chronic conditions in which things happen gradually.

However, some respiratory or chronic conditions require long-term oxygen supplementation.

Although oxygen makes up about 20 percent of the air around us, breathing in high concentrations of oxygen can damage your lungs. On the other hand, not getting enough oxygen in the blood, a condition called hypoxia, could damage the heart, brain, and other organs.

How to set oxygen level on concentrator?

How are my oxygen levels controlled at home?

Oxygen levels are monitored with a small device called a pulse oximeter.

Pulse oximeters are usually attached to the tip of a finger. The devices use rays of light to indirectly measure the level of oxygen in the blood without having to draw a blood sample.

Oxygen Concentrator + Pulse oximeter

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Portable Oxygen Concentrator continuous Flow

Oxygen Concentrator Portable

Instead of scheduling regular refills or replacements for tanks, a portable oxygen concentrator takes in ambient air and sends it through a filtration process to produce medical-grade quality oxygen.

How to Set oxygen level on concentrator?

How to Set oxygen level on concentrator?

Life changes when you need supplemental oxygen on a regular basis. Portable oxygen concentrators are little machines that change lives.

portable oxygen concentrator

Smallest portable oxygen concentrator

Life changes when you need supplemental oxygen on a regular basis. Portable oxygen concentrators are little machines that change lives.

FAA Approved Oxygen Concentrator

Each year, millions of travelers fly on commercial airlines in the United States and around the globe. As air travel has become more affordable, it has also become more accessible for people with serious medical conditions, including respiratory problems.

The Air Carrier Access Act, originally passed in 1986 and revised in 2009, prohibits airlines from discriminating against passengers based on disabilities.

While this legislation enhances the freedom of travelers, the varying policies of different airlines concerning the use of portable oxygen can cause confusion among travelers.

Adding to the challenge, some healthcare providers are not always aware that certain patients may require portable oxygen while traveling.

Moreover, they may not be familiar with the resources available for travelers who require oxygen therapy, and, therefore, are unable to advise their patients adequately.

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Airline approved oxygen concentrator

Regulations established by the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) require that air pressure in commercial aircraft be maintained at a level equal to or lower than 8,000 feet above sea level.

For most passengers, this provides enough oxygen to breathe comfortably. For passengers with lung disease, however, this level may not be sufficient to meet their needs

How to travel with oxygen on a plane?

Will I Need Oxygen on My Trip? FAA Approved Oxygen Concentrator:

If you use oxygen on a regular basis, you will most likely need portable oxygen whenever you travel. Also, patients with certain types of lung disease may need oxygen therapy when traveling, even if they do not normally use portable oxygen.

When planning air travel, be sure to ask your doctor whether you will need portable oxygen for your trip if you have any of the following problems:

  • Emphysema or “COPD”
  • Pulmonary fibrosis or interstitial lung disease
  • Pulmonary hypertension
  • Have difficulty breathing with normal daily activity

List of FAA-approved portable oxygen concentrators

Air carriers with flights departing from or arriving in the United States now allow the use of FAA-approved portable oxygen concentrators (POCs) by passengers. Travelers who choose this type of equipment are responsible for supplying and operating their own POC unit.

As of January 2010, many portable oxygen concentrators have been approved by the FAA for use by passengers on commercial aircraft. They are the following FAA Approved Oxygen Concentrator:

  • AirSep (R) FreeStyle™
  • AirSep(R) LifeStyle™
  • Delphi RS-00400 (Central Air)
  • DeVilbiss Healthcare iGo®
  • Inogen One™
  • Inogen One G2™
  • International Biophysics LifeChoice®
  • Invacare XPO100™
  • Oxlife Independence Oxygen Concentrator
  • Phillips Respironics EverGo™
  • SeQual Eclipse 3™

Several types of portable oxygen equipment are available for use when traveling; however, not all types are allowed for use during flight.

The system that is right for you depends on your travel plans, your health requirements, and your personal preferences.

Compressed Oxygen

Compressed oxygen is stored in pressurized aluminum tanks or cylinders. A regulator, or valve, is used to adjust the oxygen flow rate. Compressed oxygen units are simple to operate but they are often heavy. Some users may need assistance to move and position the units properly.

Compressed oxygen systems can be used on commercial aircraft only if they are supplied by the airline. (See “Use of Oxygen on Commercial Airline”)

Portable Oxygen Concentrators

These lightweight electronic devices extract oxygen from the air and provide it to users at a much richer concentration than the ambient atmosphere provides.

POC units were first approved by the FAA for use on commercial aircraft in 2005 and are now allowed on most flights. (See “Use of Oxygen on Commercial Airlines”) These devices are usually powered by batteries that must be regularly replaced or recharged.

Liquid Oxygen

Liquid oxygen systems consist of lightweight units with a small reservoir that contains liquid oxygen. One example is the HELIOS Personal Oxygen System.

Portable liquid oxygen units are re$lled from larger stationary reservoirs provided by the equipment supplier. Because liquid oxygen units do not require batteries or any other external power source, they are often preferred for patients in areas without access to electricity. Liquid oxygen is classi$ed by the FAA as a hazardous material.

For this reason, the use of liquid oxygen systems by travelers on commercial aircraft is prohibited. A portable liquid oxygen system can, however, be checked in along with a passenger’s luggage if the oxygen reservoir has been emptied.

Which airlines provide inflight oxygen?

Use of Oxygen on Commercial Airlines – FAA Approved Oxygen Concentrator:

Policies concerning the use of in-flight oxygen vary substantially among airlines.

Contact your airline or check your airline’s Web site to obtain its specific guidelines on oxygen use during flight.

Airlines require a minimum of 72 hours advance notice before your flight if you plan to travel with oxygen. For this reason, planning ahead is essential. Be sure to review procedures and complete all necessary paperwork required by the airline as early as possible.

Airlines generally require a “Physician’s Statement”—a written authorization signed by your doctor, that verifies your need for oxygen therapy. This document also outlines any specific oxygen delivery instructions that you and the airline need to know.

Many carriers have their own airline-specific medical forms that must be signed and dated within a certain period, (eg, 10 days or less) before travel. Be sure to check with your airline about its specific policies.

  • Air carriers typically offer two basic options for oxygen therapy during flight:
    • carrier-supplied compressed oxygen or
    • use of personal portable oxygen concentrators.

Flying with oxygen concentrator

Carrier-Supplied Compressed Oxygen

Various airlines provide compressed oxygen during flight as a service to passengers who need oxygen therapy. Fees for this service vary based on the duration of the flight or the number of flight segments in the trip. Your insurance policy may cover some of the costs associated with your in-flight oxygen needs.

Check with your insurance carrier to determine the speci$cs of your coverage. Maximum flow rates and available equipment, such as masks, vary among airlines.

Be sure to clarify your specific oxygen requirements with your doctor and communicate your needs to the airline before your flight. Also, be mindful that oxygen provided by the carrier will be available only while you are onboard the aircraft.

Airlines do NOT provide oxygen for passengers when they are in the terminal either before or after a flight. If your trip includes connecting $ghts with a different airline, you must make separate arrangements with each carrier before your departure.

Remember that you are responsible for managing your own oxygen needs during any layovers in your trip and also during your stay at your destination. If necessary, contact your oxygen supplier, and ask to have a representative meet you with portable oxygen at the airport when you arrive.

If in-flight oxygen service is not available, in most cases you will be able to use a personal oxygen concentrator (POC) during your flight.

FAA Approved Oxygen Concentrator rentals

POC units may be rented or purchased from oxygen suppliers or medical device companies. The decision to purchase or lease usually depends on the anticipated length of use. All airlines require a Physician’s Statement from patients traveling with POCs. This document verifies that the patient is knowledgeable and capable of operating the POC unit. Not all FAA-approved POCs are permitted on all airplanes.

Some airlines only allow certain POCs on selected flights. Always check in advance that the POC you intend to use is approved by your airline for your specific flight. POCs o”er several advantages over other oxygen delivery systems for travelers. Unlike carrier-supplied oxygen, these devices can be used by passengers during long layovers or delays.

Travelers can also use this lightweight and convenient equipment at their final destination without making any additional arrangements.

Can you fly with oxygen tank?

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) does not allow passengers to bring liquid oxygen or portable oxygen tanks on flights by any means. You can, however, bring your portable oxygen concentrator onboard with you.

How to fly with oxygen?

The only oxygen equipment allowed on an airplane is the portable oxygen concentrator (POC). If you need oxygen in flight, you must take a portable oxygen concentrator with you, and, you must let your airline know ahead of time.

More on this story

Portable Oxygen Concentrator FAA Approved

Portable Oxygen Concentrator FAA Approved

The Federal Aviation Administration generally prohibits the use of personal oxygen units during flights because they contain compressed gas or liquid oxygen, which are defined as hazardous materials.

What portable oxygen concentrators are approved by the FAA

What portable oxygen concentrators are approved by the FAA?

The Federal Aviation Administration, or FAA, has ruled that all passengers who require oxygen must be allowed to bring FAA-approved portable oxygen concentrators on all U.S. aircraft with more than 19 seats.

Portable Oxygen Concentrator continuous Flow

Portable Oxygen Concentrator continuous Flow

Instead of scheduling regular refills or replacements for tanks, a portable oxygen concentrator takes in ambient air and sends it through a filtration process to produce medical-grade quality oxygen.